Matthew Spitzer

Matthew Spitzer

Program Associate
Expertise
  • Results-based financing
  • Data analytics and visualization
  • Impact evaluation
  • Survey design
Focus Areas
  • International Research
  • Energy and Climate
  • Health and Nutrition
  • Food and Agriculture
About Matthew

Matt Spitzer contributes to research projects in Mathematica's International Unit by analyzing large, complex data sets in multiple programming languages such as R and Stata. In addition to data analysis, he is experienced in assessing payment triggers for results-based payment mechanisms, including development impact bonds.

Spitzer’s project work covers the health, energy, agriculture, and justice sectors and spans South Asia, Africa, and the United States in its geographical scope. In his work on the Utkrisht Development Impact Bond project, he coordinates data collection and analyzes data for reports that trigger payments from outcome funders to investors. In the Liberia Energy project, he contributes to survey design, analyzes data, and uses R to conduct spatial analysis and generate maps. These analyses underlie reports that inform policymakers in U.S. and Liberian governments about the state of electricity infrastructure in Liberia. As part of the Oakland Unite project, he analyzed administrative data sets to understand the impact of a peer-led group cognitive behavioral treatment program on prevalence of violence and recidivism in Oakland, California. Spitzer also supported analyses that used techniques such as mediation analysis and multiple imputation as part of Mathematica's evaluation of the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s Agriculture Development Project in Burkina Faso. In the Morocco Fisheries project, he prepared a data set of over 6 million fish catch transactions for interrupted time series analysis. He used these data to create visualizations in R that illustrated trends over time that unveil how infrastructure investments in fish ports and fish landing sites influence the price and quality of fish.

Before joining Mathematica, Spitzer worked in policy and communications at Innovations for Poverty Action and at the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics, where he co-coordinated a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of human and physical capital augmentation on small-scale craftsmen in Nairobi, Kenya. Spitzer’s research has been published in the Journal of Public Economics. He holds a B.A. in Economics and a B.A. in Religion from Middlebury College.