Paul Shattuck

Paul Shattuck

Senior Fellow
Expertise
  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Health and social services research and policy
Focus Areas
  • Health
  • Disability
  • Quality Improvement
About Paul

Paul Shattuck is a nationally recognized expert in autism spectrum disorders, and he pioneered the understanding of autism in adulthood and the measurement of autism outcomes. His other research interests include improving community systems and services, understanding the long-range impact of social determinants of health and examining the intersection of climate change and public health.

Shattuck is currently focused on approaches for measuring and improving the performance and equity of systems of care for vulnerable populations using collaborative community engagement. He is also collaborating with foundations on a range of health and disability topics. An abiding passion of his is helping translate scientific findings into useful guidance for policy and practice in the areas of health and social services. He is also a member of Mathematica's Equity Community of Practice.

Before joining Mathematica in 2020, Shattuck was a professor at Drexel University, where he was the founding leader of the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute’s Life Course Outcomes Program, the National Autism Data Center, and the Transition Pathways Community Partnership Initiative. He oversaw an integrated strategy for conducting, translating, and disseminating research to improve community-based services and inform national policies aimed at helping teens and adults on the autism spectrum. He also trained in methods of public health surveillance and epidemiology as a postdoctoral fellow funded by the National Institutes of Health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and was a professor at Washington University in St. Louis. Before his academic career, Shattuck worked in social services doing tenant organizing, developing affordable housing, and designing programs for vulnerable populations—including homeless youth and families, migrant farmworkers, preschool children, and incarcerated men.

He has a Ph.D. in social welfare from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.