State Differences in the Vocational Rehabilitation Experiences of Transition-Age Youth with Disabilities (Journal Article)

Publisher: Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, vol. 42, no. 1 (subscription required)
Jan 30, 2015
Authors
Todd Honeycutt, Allison Thompkins, Maura Bardos, and Steven Stern

Key Findings:

  • The percentage of a state's transition-age youth population who applied for VR services ranged from 4 to 14 percent; the percentage of applicants who received VR services ranged from 31 to 82 percent; and the percentage of youth who received services and closed with an employment outcome ranged from 40 to 70 percent.

State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies play a critical role in helping transition-age youth with disabilities attain their vocational goals, though there is insufficient knowledge about how agencies serve this population. OBJECTIVE: The study examines the extent to which states' transition-age youth with disabilities apply for VR services, receive services, and are employed at case closure. METHODS: The analysis included five ratios for each state VR agency reflecting their involvement with transition-age youth at distinct stages, using data from the RSA-911 Case Service Report and other sources to identify a cohort of individuals who applied between 2004 and 2006. RESULTS: The percentage of a state's transition-age youth population who applied for VR services ranged from 4 to 14 percent; the percentage of applicants who received VR services ranged from 31 to 82 percent; and the percentage of youth who received services and closed with an employment outcome ranged from 40 to 70 percent. Several agency- and state-level factors were correlated with these ratios. CONCLUSIONS: The wide variation in transition statistics suggests that policymakers could improve VR services for transition-age youth by developing specific standards and guidelines for VR agencies serving this population, though this study points out several limitations and challenges with such an approach.

Project

Disability Research Consortium

Funders

Social Security Administration

Time Frame

2012-2019

Senior Staff

Todd Honeycutt
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