Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study

Impacts of Comprehensive Teacher Induction: Final Results from a Randomized Controlled Study

Published: Jun 30, 2010
Publisher: Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education
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Associated Project

Supporting New Teachers: Evaluating Teacher Induction Models

Time frame: 2004-2010

Prepared for:

U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences

Authors

Steven Glazerman

Eric Isenberg

Matthew Jacobus

Key Findings
Compared to business-as-usual induction programs, two years of comprehensive induction can boost student achievement.
Teacher induction programs are designed to support new teachers and reduce teacher turnover. Comprehensive teacher induction, however, goes beyond traditional induction by relying on carefully selected and trained full-time mentors and also includes an intensive curriculum involving instructional support and professional development, opportunities to observe experienced teachers, and assessment tools for teachers that permit ongoing evaluation of practice and constructive feedback. Final results from Mathematica’s national evaluation show that compared to business-as-usual induction programs, two years of comprehensive induction can boost student achievement. For teachers who received one year of comprehensive induction, however, there was no impact. The study found no impacts on other outcomes.

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